Go Ask Alices

Alice in Wonderland

So I was hunting down a new version of the “Alice” stop motion bit (because if I find an embedded vid has been taken down, I’ll do my best to put a new one up in its place–remember, we love you) and when searching for “Alice in Wonderland” saw there was a few vids out there. So it’s time for an “Alice in Wonderland” round-up.

First up, 1903. A silent version from England. It’s in terrible shape, mind, but the original poster explains all on the YouTube page itself. (Update: That vid was removed, so here’s another version of same)

Direct link for the feedreaders.


Next, we go to 1923. And no, it’s not exactly Lewis Carroll, but it is “Alice’s Wonderland,” the silent Laugh-o-Gram from Disney. And as I understand it, the very end of the film is lost. However, it and the other “Alice Comedies” are available on the Disney Rarities Walt Disney Treasure release. And if you don’t have it already, do go fix that. It’s worth it.

Direct link for the feedreaders.

And now, 1933, with Charlotte Henry’s Alice meeting up with the White Knight. And you wouldn’t know it to look at him, but that is Gary Cooper. Also featured in this version is Sterling Holloway, Cary Grant, and W.C. Fields. And apparently it’s never been released on DVD or VHS. So go figure.

Direct link for the feedreaders.

And then…1949. And then later, 1951. Because when Disney was going to release his animated Alice, this one by Lou Bunin was set to hit around the same time, only to be hit with an injunction that delayed its release. This one, however, is available on DVD.

Direct link for the feedreaders.

And as might be expected, the 1951 Disney animated version. We have the theatrical trailer for you here. I would love to see the Lou Bunin one and this one in a double feature. Just because. This is, of course, available from Disney on DVD.

Direct link for the feedreaders.

1966 saw an animated “Alice in Wonderland” from Hanna-Barbera. And the inevitable tie-in commercials followed:

Direct link for the feedreaders.

Also, in 1966, Jonathan Miller created a version for the BBC that had a host of stars: Leo McKern, Michael Redgrave, Michael Gough, John Gielgud, Peter Cook and Peter Sellers among them. It’s available on DVD as well.

Direct link for the feedreaders.

1972, then. And back to Britain for a musical version starring Michael Crawford (yes, the Phantom). This small snippet contains Peter Sellers and Dudley Moore, unrecognizable as the March Hare and Dormouse, respectively.

Well, I say unrecognizable, but the Dormouse’s drunken mumblings do take on a bit of Arthur Bach for a few seconds. See if you don’t agree. This version is available on DVD.

Direct link for the feedreaders.

The 1985 Hallmark version has a huge cast. Huge. In the snippet, you see featured Sid Caesar as The Gryphon, Jayne Meadows as the Queen of Hearts, and Red Buttons as The White Rabbit.

Direct link for the feedreaders.

So there you go, a tour of Alices. Oh wait. Missed one.

Direct link for the feedreaders.

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By | 2017-09-24T23:25:04+00:00 November 14th, 2007|Stimuli|1 Comment

One Comment

  1. Shine March 25, 2010 at 12:03 pm

    You forgot about the 1999 made for TV movie. It’s one of my favorites!

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